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25 Years of the Amazing, the most wonderful Space Telescope, Hubble

MKT Library has been away for sometime and as a come back, we thought of bringing you some Hubble-Mania.. Hope you enjoy…

As Hubble and the team working on it celebrate their 25th year anniversary, we celebrate and welcome another year of the wonderful and the always amazing Hubble Space Telescope. Cheers to science and many years to come.

This NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the cluster Westerlund 2 and its surroundings has been released to celebrate Hubbles 25th year in orbit and a quarter of a century of new discoveries, stunning images and outstanding science. The images central region, containing the star cluster, blends visible-light data taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys and near-infrared exposures taken by the Wide Field Camera 3. The surrounding region is composed of visible-light observations taken by the Advanced Camera for Surveys. Picture: NASA/ESA/HUBBLE

In the centre of this image, taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, is the galaxy cluster SDSS J1038+4849 and it seems to be smiling. You can make out its two orange eyes and white button nose. In the case of this happy face , the two eyes are very bright galaxies and the misleading smile lines are actually arcs caused by an effect known as strong gravitational lensing.Galaxy clusters are the most massive structures in the Universe and exert such a powerful gravitational pull that they warp the spacetime around them and act as cosmic lenses which can magnify, distort and bend the light behind them. This phenomenon, crucial to many of Hubble s discoveries, can be explained by Einstein s theory of general relativity. In this special case of gravitational lensing, a ring known as an Einstein Ring is produced from this bending of light, a consequence of the exact and symmetrical alignment of the source, lens and observer and resulting in the ring-like structure we see here. Hubble has provided astronomers with the tools to probe these massive galaxies and model their lensing effects, allowing us to peer further into the early Universe than ever before. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

This the spiral galaxy M51, also known as the Whirlpool Galaxy, and its companion galaxy (R) Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

Appearing like a winged fairy-tale creature poised on a pedestal, this object is actually a billowing tower of cold gas and dust rising from a stellar nursery called the Eagle Nebula. The soaring tower is 9.5 light-years or about 90 trillion kilometres high, about twice the distance from our Sun to the next nearest star. Picture: ESA/Hubble/NASA

Centaurus A, also known as NGC 5128, is well known for its dramatic dusty lanes of dark material. Hubble’s new observations, using its most advanced instrument, the Wide Field Camera 3, are the most detailed ever made of this galaxy. They have been combined here in a multi-wavelength image which reveals never-before-seen detail in the dusty portion of the galaxy.As well as features in the visible spectrum, this composite shows ultraviolet light, which comes from young stars, and near-infrared light, which lets us glimpse some of the detail otherwise obscured by the dust. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

This composite image is a view of the colorful Helix Nebula taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys aboard NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope and the Mosaic II Camera on the 4-meter telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile. The object is so large that both telescopes were needed to capture a complete view. The Helix is a planetary nebula, the glowing gaseous envelope expelled by a dying, sun-like star. The Helix resembles a simple doughnut as seen from Earth. But looks can be deceiving. New evidence suggests that the Helix consists of two gaseous disks nearly perpendicular to each other. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

the Hubble Space Telescope has caught Jupiter’s moon Ganymede playing a game of ‘peek-a-boo.’ In this Hubble image, Ganymede is shown just before it ducks behind the giant planet. Ganymede completes an orbit around Jupiter every seven days. Because Ganymede’s orbit is tilted nearly edge-on to Earth, it routinely can be seen passing in front of and disappearing behind its giant host, only to reemerge later. Composed of rock and ice, Ganymede is the largest moon in our solar system. It is even larger than the planet Mercury. But Ganymede looks like a dirty snowball next to Jupiter, the largest planet in our solar system. Picture: ESA/Hubble/NASA/AFP/Getty Images

This celestial object looks like a delicate butterfly. But it is far from serene.What resemble dainty butterfly wings are actually roiling cauldrons of gas heated to nearly 20 000 degrees Celsius. The gas is tearing across space at more than 950 000 kilometres per hour — fast enough to travel from Earth to the Moon in 24 minutes!A dying star that was once about five times the mass of the Sun is at the centre of this fury. It has ejected its envelope of gases and is now unleashing a stream of ultraviolet radiation that is making the cast-off material glow. This object is an example of a planetary nebula, so-named because many of them have a round appearance resembling that of a planet when viewed through a small telescope. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

This image of a pair of interacting galaxies called Arp 273 was released to celebrate the 21st anniversary of the launch of the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.The distorted shape of the larger of the two galaxies shows signs of tidal interactions with the smaller of the two. It is thought that the smaller galaxy has actually passed through the larger one. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

Star V838 Monocerotis’s (V838 Mon) light echo, which is about six light years in diameter, is seen from the Hubble Space Telescope in this February 2004 handout photo released by NASA on December 4, 2011. Light from the flash is reflected by successively more distant rings in the ambient interstellar dust that already surrounded the star. V838 Mon lies about 20,000 light years away toward the constellation of Monoceros the unicorn. It became the brightest star in the Milky Way Galaxy in January 2002 when its outer surface greatly expanded suddenly. Picture: REUTERS/ NASA, ESA, H. E. Bond

This craggy fantasy mountaintop enshrouded by wispy clouds looks like a bizarre landscape from Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image, which is even more dramatic than fiction, captures the chaotic activity atop a pillar of gas and dust, three light-years tall, which is being eaten away by the brilliant light from nearby bright stars. The pillar is also being assaulted from within, as infant stars buried inside it fire off jets of gas that can be seen streaming from towering peaks. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

Hubble has taken this stunning close-up shot of part of the Tarantula Nebula. This star-forming region of ionised hydrogen gas is in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy which neighbours the Milky Way. It is home to many extreme conditions including supernova remnants and the heaviest star ever found. The Tarantula Nebula is the most luminous nebula of its type in the local Universe. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

Undated file photo of Mars, as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope. A close encounter of the Martian kind was due to occur Wednesday June 13 2001, and could trigger a flood of UFO reports. Mars was heading towards its closest approach to Earth in more than a dozen years. The planet will be approximately 42 million miles away close enough for the polar ice caps to be seen through a small telescope. Picture: PA/NASA Planetary Photojournal

Star formation is one of the most important processes in shaping the Universe; it plays a pivotal role in the evolution of galaxies and it is also in the earliest stages of star formation that planetary systems first appear.Yet there is still much that astronomers don’t understand, such as how do the properties of stellar nurseries vary according to the composition and density of gas present, and what triggers star formation in the first place? The driving force behind star formation is particularly unclear for a type of galaxy called a flocculent spiral, such as NGC 2841 shown here, which features short spiral arms rather than prominent and well-defined galactic limbs. Picture: NASA/ESA/Hubble

More Images:

The Telegraph

Galary at Hubble Site

6 comments on “25 Years of the Amazing, the most wonderful Space Telescope, Hubble

  1. Reblogged this on Chouett and commented:
    Because 25 years of space discovery is worth celebrating!! Happy Birthday Hubble!!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hello, and thanks so much for creating this wonderful resource!! I was trying to find an email address for you but cannot find one. Could you please email me at chouettblog@gmail.com? I have a question to ask you. LaChouett 🙂

    Like

    • mktlibrary
      April 29, 2015

      It is a pleasure and an honor to have you read my Blog. You are running a wonderful blog as well. Books reviews. Your work is admirable.
      Feel free to email me mktlibrary@outlook.com.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hello, and thank you so much for responding. I have just sent you an email. Oh and just in case, check your junk mail. I am going to tell everyone about your site! It’s brillant!

        Liked by 1 person

      • mktlibrary
        April 29, 2015

        Thank you so very much for your interest in my humble work. I saw your email and I will respond to you soon.
        Thanks again. Talk to you soon.

        Like

  3. Pingback: MKT Library on Twitter and Facebook, Follow, Share and Support | MKT Library

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This entry was posted on April 27, 2015 by in Astronomy, Sci-Media, Space and tagged , , , , , .

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